Germany: Asylum-seeking process

Germany received by far the largest number of refugees in the EU last year — with over one million migrants currently making their way through the asylum-seeking process. This is how Germany processes them once they make it over the border.

1. Arrival

Asylum seekers are admited to a ‘reception centre’ of the relevant state and distributed according to the ‘Königsteiner formula’ (see below).

A

MEDICAL SCREENING

B

CHECK FOR WEAPONS, CELL PHONE TAKEN AWAY AND DATA COPIED

2. Interview

and assessment.

3. Submittal

The asylum application is submitted to responsible branch Federal Office for Migration and Refugees for exam and decision.

4. Distribution camp

Before given temporary housing.

5. Certificate permission

To reside in a state while awaiting an asylum.

UNSUCCESSFUL

If neither asylum or refugee protection can be granted, BAMF decides if there are grounds for deportation.

SUCCESSFUL

Asylum seekers receive a temporary residence permit and are given the same status as Germans within the social security system.

11.1

months

AVERAGE TIME FOR THE ASYLUM PROCESS, 2014 (2015 DATA NOT YET AVAILABLE)

The ‘ Königsteiner formula’

Asylum seekers arriving in Germany are distributed around the country using a quota known as the ‘Königsteiner Schlüssel’, in which the wealthier and more populous German states take a higher percentage of asylum applicants. Nearly 50% were concentrated in just the top three states from January to September 2015. For the asylum seeker, that decision is binding - they must accept the state to which they're assigned while they await a decision on their case.

NR Westphalia

21%

Bavaria

15%

13%

Baden

-Wuttemberg

Main countries

of origin

January-December 2015 (rounded up/down).

REJECTION

RATE*

Syria

Afghanistan

Iraq

Albania

Kosovo

428,000

0.02%

154,000

20.6%

121,000

0.46%

69,000

99.8%

33,000

99.5%

*2015 (January-October).

Top 3 priority

1

SYRIA

2

IRAQ (religious minorities)

3

ERITREA

SOURCES: BAMF, ASYLUM INFORMATION DATABASE & HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH & THE GUARDIAN | UNIVISION

Germany: Asylum-seeking process

Germany received by far the largest number of refugees in the EU last year — with over one million migrants currently making their way through the asylum-seeking process. This is how Germany processes them once they make it over the border.

5. Certificate

permission

2. Interview

1. Arrival

and assessment.

Asylum seekers are admited to a ‘reception centre’ of the relevant state and distributed according to the ‘Königsteiner formula’ (see below).

To reside in a state while awaiting an asylum.

UNSUCCESSFUL

3. Submittal

If neither asylum or refugee protection can be granted, BAMF decides if there are grounds for deportation.

The asylum application is submitted to responsible branch Federal Office for Migration and Refugees for exam and decision.

A

MEDICAL SCREENING

SUCCESSFUL

B

Asylum seekers receive a temporary residence permit and are given the same status as Germans within the social security system.

4. Distribution camp

CHECK FOR WEAPONS, CELL PHONE TAKEN AWAY AND DATA COPIED

Before given temporary housing.

11.1

months

AVERAGE TIME FOR THE ASYLUM PROCESS, 2014 (2015 DATA NOT YET AVAILABLE)

The ‘Königsteiner formula’

Main countries of origin

Asylum seekers arriving in Germany are distributed around the country using a quota known as the ‘Königsteiner Schlüssel’, in which the wealthier and more populous German states take a higher percentage of asylum applicants. Nearly 50% were concentrated in just the top three states from January to September 2015. For the asylum seeker, that decision is binding - they must accept the state to which they're assigned while they await a decision on their case.

January-December 2015 (rounded up/down).

REJECTION

RATE*

Syria

Afghanistan

Iraq

Albania

Kosovo

428,000

0.02%

154,000

20.6%

121,000

0.46%

69,000

99.8%

99.5%

33,000

*2015 (January-October).

NR Westphalia

Top 3 priority

21%

1

SYRIA

2

IRAQ (religious minorities)

Bavaria

15%

3

ERITREA

13%

Baden

-Wuttemberg

SOURCES: BAMF, ASYLUM INFORMATION DATABASE & HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH & THE GUARDIAN | UNIVISION

Germany: Asylum-seeking process

Germany received by far the largest number of refugees in the EU last year — with over one million migrants currently making their way through the asylum-seeking process. This is how Germany processes them once they make it over the border.

5. Certificate

permission

2. Interview

1. Arrival

and assessment.

Asylum seekers are admited to a ‘reception centre’ of the relevant state and distributed according to the ‘Königsteiner formula’ (see below).

To reside in a state while awaiting an asylum.

UNSUCCESSFUL

3. Submittal

If neither asylum or refugee protection can be granted, BAMF decides if there are grounds for deportation.

The asylum application is submitted to responsible branch Federal Office for Migration and Refugees for exam and decision.

A

MEDICAL SCREENING

SUCCESSFUL

B

Asylum seekers receive a temporary residence permit and are given the same status as Germans within the social security system.

4. Distribution camp

CHECK FOR WEAPONS, CELL PHONE TAKEN AWAY AND DATA COPIED

Before given temporary housing.

11.1

months

AVERAGE TIME FOR THE ASYLUM PROCESS, 2014 (2015 DATA NOT YET AVAILABLE)

The ‘Königsteiner formula’

Main countries of origin

Asylum seekers arriving in Germany are distributed around the country using a quota known as the ‘Königsteiner Schlüssel’, in which the wealthier and more populous German states take a higher percentage of asylum applicants. Nearly 50% were concentrated in just the top three states from January to September 2015. For the asylum seeker, that decision is binding - they must accept the state to which they're assigned while they await a decision on their case.

January-December 2015 (rounded up/down).

REJECTION

RATE*

Syria

Afghanistan

Iraq

Albania

Kosovo

428,000

0.02%

154,000

20.6%

121,000

0.46%

69,000

99.8%

99.5%

33,000

*2015 (January-October).

NR Westphalia

Top 3 priority

21%

1

SYRIA

2

IRAQ (religious minorities)

Bavaria

15%

3

ERITREA

13%

Baden

-Wuttemberg

SOURCES: BAMF, ASYLUM INFORMATION DATABASE & HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH & THE GUARDIAN | UNIVISION